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NASH THE SLASH

The Artoffact Records vinyl reissue Click Here
Nash the Slash is best known to most Numan fans for the Gary Numan Wembley farewell concerts back in 1981. He also supported Gary in 1980 for the north America tour and for Gary's 1980 UK tour.

Nash the Slash born Jeff Plewman (March 26, 1948 – May 10 or 11, 2014), but better known by his stage name Nash the Slash a Canadian musician and a multi-instrumentalist, he was known primarily for playing electric violin and mandolin, as well as harmonica, keyboards, glockenspiel, and other instruments (sometimes described as "devices" on album notes.

Nash's music covers an eclectic range, varying from instrumental—mood-setting music, to rock and pop music with vocals. Nash the Slash described his music as techno frash, electronic rock n roll. 1975 see Nash worked manly as a solo artist but in 1976; he founded the progressive rock band FM. Soon after releasing the band's first album, Black Noise, in 1977, but Nash left the band; resuming his solo career in 1978.

Nash has performed with surgical bandages covering his face since 1979. "During a gig at The Edge in the late '70s to raise awareness of the threat from the Three Mile Island disaster, he walked on stage wearing bandages dipped in phosphorus paint shouting to the crowd: 'Look, this is what happens to you.' The bandages became his trademark.

Nash always tried to keep he’s true identity a secret, although the Star profile of 1978 had already revealed his real name. Nevertheless, in a 1981 interview with the UK magazine Smash Hits, Nash was questioned about his real name, and replied with "Nashville Thebodiah Slasher". The name "Nash the Slash" was born from silent film, and the name "Nash the Slash" comes from that of a killer butler encountered by Laurel and Hardy in their first film, Do Detectives Think? (1927).

Nash also formed he’s own independent record label Cut-Throat Records. 

2012 Nash announced his retirement via his website on November 6, 2012, stating he was "rolling up the bandages" and shutting down his official website on December 31. He thanked his loyal fans for their support during his 40 years as an independent artist, but stated that live gigs no longer excited him and that his "eccentric style / genre finds no place into today's scene." He also mentioned the "theft of music on the internet devastated a very important source of income."

On May 10, 2014, Nash died at his home in Toronto at age 66, from a suspected heart attack. His death was announced on Facebook by friend and collaborator Robert Vanderhorst, who wrote that Plewman passed away over the weekend. Vanderhorst also confirmed the death in an interview with the Toronto Star.

2016 Canadian cult-hero Nash the Slash's early catalogue is reissued through Canadian label Artoffact Records.

Artoffact reissued CD and vinyl remasters of  Nash's first record, Dreams & Nightmares, as well as his most popular full-length Children of The Night, the super-rare live album Hammersmith Holocaust, and the EP Bedside Companion. Long-time Nash admirer Gary Numan has penned the liner notes for Hammersmith Holocaust.

1978 BEDSIDE COMPANION
Fever Dream
Masquerade
Blind Windows
Million Year Picnic
The first release on Cut-Throat Records and solo record would be the 1978 Bedside Companion 12” EP compiling of 4 electronic instrumentals, heavily featuring the hunting electric violin.
1979 DREAMS & NIGHTMARES
Islands
Ylla
The Chase
Un Chien Andalou
Blind Windows/Countervail
Mooncurse
Lost Lenore
Til Death Do Us Part
1979 see the first full album by Nash titled Dreams & Nightmares a collection of instrumental horror stories. The cover also had Nash the Slash on it covered in he’s trademark bandages so was born the legend Nash the Slash. It sold over 12,000 copies in the first year - one of the most successful independent releases at that time. Nash gained notoriety for his bizarre and macabre act, and for that reason he become a very sort after support act for bands and artists of the time, such as Devo, Pere Ubu and Elvis Costello.
1980 Nash released a 7 minute twisted cover of Jan & Dean's "Dead Man's Curve" with vocals, propelled him to greater public recognition. The B-side, "Swing Shift (Souixante-Neuf)" also featured vocals, and was co-composed with lyricist Toby Dammit, with whom Nash further collaborated over the next few years. Music videos were made for both songs. He also toured New York. This led to opening slots for the likes of XTC and Gary Numan across North America. That summer he found himself on his most auspicious tour to this day, on the same card as The Who in front of his hometown crowd at CNE Stadium. Though he offered to do the gig for free, he would end up being paid $125 - minimum union wage. 
A second tour with Gary Numan was planned in the UK. But before he ever made it onto the stage his electric mandolins were stolen - prompting a feature on a Scotland Yard TV program - similar to Crime Stoppers. Hastily-gathered replacements saw the completion of the tour.
( re-issued on CD together with Bedside Companion as Blind Windows in 1997)
1980 Hammersmith Holocaust
Wolf
Dopes on the Water
Children of the Night
Barbara O'Riley
Danger Zone
Ultra-limited edition (300 copies) live "official" bootleg of Hammersmith Holocaust, recorded at The Hammersmith Odeon opening for Gary Numan. All three hundred copies are hand-stamped by Nash and Mike Dent, his sound tech. This is the rarest of Nash recordings. 

In September, 1980, Gary Numan called up for Nash to do tour of U.K. The call came on a Thursday night. Gary wanted Nash to come to England to start the tour on the following Monday! Needless to say it was chaotic. Nash had two roadies but could only take one with him due to costs. He chose the stage/sound tech, Mike Dent. That left the problem of passports. With connections in Ottawa, both passports were issued within 48 hours. The next problem was getting there as Nash didn't have the $2,000 for airfare and equipment. A quick call to Laurie Dunn at Virgin Publishing in London and Nash had an immediate advance and the first flight out on Monday morning. The first show was in Birmingham that night, but due to delays and the long drive up from London, Nash didn't make it. The first performance of Nash The Slash in England would be the next night in Manchester. The tour arrived London on September 16 for two nights at the Hammersmith Odeon. This is a very old building in the heart of London and not very secure. While equipment is left set up on stage overnight, thieves break in and steal two of Numan's keyboards and both of Nash's mandolins, which are in one case that resembles a guitar case. The loss is devastating. Unlike a keyboard or guitar, electric mandolins are hard to find, and Nash's instruments were custom made. The famous "Skull" mando might be gone forever. Scotland Yard is called in to investigate and a police drawing of the Skull mando is shown on a TV show called Crime Search. This show is usually dedicated to jewelry heists in Knightsbridge, but being a foreign visitor, Nash is given special attention. As Russell Bell (Numan's guitarist) said to Nash at the time, "I once had my stereo stolen and it didn't get on Crime Search!" 

On the second night at the Hammersmith, Nash does a shortened set, playing just violin. Before the tour continues in Portsmouth, Nash must find another mandolin. After searching all over London, Nash settles on a cheap Japanese model, and with some serious alterations, it becomes a functional instrument. This instrument will be used for the rest of the tour, as well as on the upcoming recording sessions for the Children of the Night LP. Nash calls back home to Canada for a new mandolin to be made. Vladomir Bosnar, the maker of all Nash mandos, goes to work on another black model. The first of the two nights at Hammersmith was recorded on a cassette machine at the board. The last-known performance of the Skull mando had been preserved for posterity. This tape would come in handy very soon. 

Later that year, Nash signed with Dindisc, a sub-label of Virgin. Dindisc wanted to put out some promo records to the media, but Nash didn't have anything recorded yet. Oh yes, he does. Released in a limited edition of 300 copies live "official" bootleg of Hammersmith Holocaust, recorded at The Hammersmith Odeon, opening for Gary Numan. All three hundred copies are hand-stamped by Nash and Mike Dent, his sound tech. It takes three days of sitting on the floor of their apartment to stamp all the labels and jackets as well as number each one. The LP's are distributed to radio and music journalists. They are not for sale. This is the rarest of Nash recordings
1981 CHILDREN OF THE NIGHT
Wolf
Dead Man's Curve
Children of the Night
Deep Forest
In a Glass Eye
19th Nervous Breakdown 
Swing Shift (Soixante-Neuf)
Metropolis
Dopes on the Water
Danger Zone
1981 “Children Of The Night” the second full-length solo album. With Nash playing all instruments. Hillage does a wonderful job producing Nash, bringing out a much harder sound than heard on his debut solo release Dreams and Nightmares. Released in 1981 after Nash toured the United Kingdom in 1980 supporting Gary Numan, the album quickly gained cult status with its unique sound, created using electric mandolins, electric violins, drum machines, and other sonic devices. The album sleeve proudly proclaims “There are no guitars.”
This album rocks, complete with covers of the Rolling Stones (and brilliant version of “19th Nervous Breakdown,” which seems perfectly suited for Nash) and Deep Purple, with Nash altering the words of the classic “Smoke on the Water” to “Dopes on the Water.” He even covers Jan and Dean’s “Dead Man’s Curve,” although the version found on this album is not as powerful as Nash’s original cover found on a 7″ single (released on Nash’s own Cut-Throat Records). There are a number of interesting instrumentals full of wonderful noises that produce an awe-inspiring sound, especially the opening track “Wolf,” which includes brief moments from Peter and the Wolf. This is a very strong album, full of interesting sounds, that stands up to repeated listenings.
The album was recorded in six weeks at Britannia Row Studios, London, in late 1980 and produced by Steve Hillage. It was released on the Virgin Records label Dindisc, which was owned by Richard Branson. The album was re-released on CD in 2000 with bonus tracks. The cover photo was taken at the road entrance looking up from Paddington Station, London.

1981
With Bill Nelson producing, Slash released "Novel Romance" as a single in '81, but his journey into actual 'pop music' was less than successful. 
(reissued on CD in 2000 with bonus tracks)
Dead Man's Curve ‎(7") Cut-Throat Records CUT-3 Canada 1980 
Dead Man's Curve ‎(7") Dindisc DIN28 New Zealand 1980 
Dead Man's Curve ‎(7", Single) Dindisc VVD-45.041ES Portugal 1981 
Dead Man's Curve ‎(7", Single) Dindisc, Dindisc 102.949, 102 949 Netherlands 1981 
Dead Man's Curve ‎(7", Single) Dindisc, Dindisc DIN 28, din 28 UK 1981 
19th Nervous Breakdown ‎(7", Single) Dindisc DIN 29 UK 1981 
19th Nervous Breakdown ‎(7") Dindisc, Virgin VIN 45040 Italy 1981 
19th Nervous Breakdown ‎(7") Virgin 103 066 Germany 1981 
Flexi-disc, 7", Single Sided, 33 ⅓ RPM, Blue Orchestral Manoeuvres* / Nash The Slash ‎– Pretending To See The Future / Swing Shift
Novel Romance ‎(7") Dindisc DIN 33 1981 
1981 DECOMPOSING
The Calling
Life in Loch Ness
Womble
Pilgrim's Lament
1981
His next full album was Decomposing later that year. In between tours with The Tubes, Human League and Iggy Pop, he also appeared at a number of outdoor festivals. He also found time to appear on 3 tracks on Gary Numan's Dance album as well as tour as part of his entourage. This is the first album playable at any speed. Being all-instrumental music, there are no voices to affect the realism of the orchestrations. Thus the album becomes a collection of electronic concertos, each movement being defined by the speed of the turntable. A turntable with speeds of 33, 45 and 78 rpm, creates a different ratio within the pieces, yet maintains a familiar melodic drama. 

Saying all this, the record was recorded to produce the sound you hear at 45rpm and any compilations using tracks taken from this record reflect this. 

Deliberately playing or recording records at a higher speed gave an antic quirkiness to voices; doing so at a slower speed changed music and voice to an ominous, growling tone. Nash the Slash took advantage of this speed/tonal effect with his 1981 12-inch disc Decomposing, which featured four instrumental tracks that were engineered to play at any speed (with the playing times listed for 33⅓, 45 and 78 rpm playback). 

Decomposing gains rave reviews in Playboy magazine and The Village Voice and wins a number of awards throughout North America. Nash's wide appeal also gained the album airplay here and abroad - in places as obscure as Poland.
1982 AND YOU THOUGHT YOU WERE NORMAL
Citizen
Pretty Folks
RSVP
Vincent's Crows
Dance After Curfew
Normal
The Hypnotist
Remember When
Animal Jamboree
Stalker
1982 saw the release of And You Thought You Were Normal. The single "Dance After Curfew" was produced by Daniel Lanois in an attempt to gain a commercial acceptance. North American tours with Iggy Pop again and Kim Mitchell preceeded more international fanfare - including top album according to Billboard magazine. This included the track "Dance After Curfew" produced by Daniel Lanois prior to his association with Brian Eno. The single became a surprise club and radio hit in Poland, which was then still behind the iron curtain, where curfews and restrictions on western culture were imposed by the government of the time.
1984 see the unofficial reunion of Slash with FM 
(reissued on CD in 2000 with bonus tracks)
Dance After Curfew ‎(12") PVC Records PVC 4905 1982 
1984 AMERICAN BAND-AGES 
(American Bandstand Theme)
Bandstand Boogie
American Band
Born To Be Wild
Who Do You Love?
1984 (West Side Version)
Bandstand Boogie Reprise
Hey Joe
Psychotic Reaction
1984 (Dance Version)
Run Through the Jungle
1984 also see the release of his most commercial record to date – American Band-Ages. A collection of re-workings of rock standards, it featured covers of Grand Funk's "We're An American Band", Joe South's "Hey Joe" and CCR's "Run Through The Jungle". Ironically, tho he'd been a solo artist for the better part of eight years at this point, he was nominated that year for a Juno for best new male vocalist - losing to eventual winner Alfie Zappacosta.
(reissued on CD in 2003 with bonus tracks)
1984 ‎(12", Single) Quality QDC 301 Canada 1984 
1984 ‎(7", Single, Promo) Quality SQ 703X Canada 1984 
1984 ‎(Acetate, 10", Single) The Lacquer Channel Limited none Canada 1984
American Band ‎(7", Single) Quality Q 2448 1984
Bandstand Boogie ‎(7") FM VHF 13 1985 
1984 THE MILLION YEAR PICNIC
The Million Year Picnic
Swing Shift (Soixante-neuf)
Blind Windows/Countervail
Lost Lenore
Dead Man's Curve
The Chase
Pilgrim's Lament
Life In Loch Ness
That same year saw The Million Year Picnic - a greatest hits compilation, He couldn't have dreamed of a publicity stunt like what happened in '85. Pepsi-Cola was running TV ads which featured Rough Trade being served pop by waiters dressed in bandages and wearing sunglasses and tuxedos. A legal battle ensued - and tho Pepsi had a point when saying Nash's image was anything but original (he was criticized for stealing the gimmick from 'The Invisible Man') - they eventually settled out of court. All the while, his collaberation with Hawkins & Deller again inspired a full-fledged reunion for FM, good for 2 albums from '85 thru '87 - Con-Test and Tonight - which contained 5 tracks from Con-Test. 
Some of their music was also featured on the 1988 film 'Friday The 13th - Part 7'. Sporadic Canadian tours ensued over the next couple of years before Slash returned to his true mission in life - scoring the music to films. Between '89 and '96 he worked on several projects, including 'Black Pearls', 'A Trip Around Lake Ontario - Roadkill', 'Father Snowshoes', 'Blood & Donuts' and a pair of classic silent films - 1919's 'The Cabinet of Dr Caligari' and 'The Lost World' from 1925.
1984 4 EXTERNAL CUTS ONLY
Who Do You Love (version 1)
American Band (version 1)
Psychotic Reaction (version 1)
Who Do You Love (version 2)
American Band (version 2)
Psychotic Reaction (version 2)
4 Externalcuts Only - 2 versions of 3 previously recorded songs see the light of day.
1991 HIGHWAY 61
Pokey Remembers
The Clothesline
Pickerel Falls Sunrise
The Getaway
Pokey Finds A Body
Ice Blues
Afternoon In The Barbershop
War (Margo's Song)
Pokey Meets The Devil
Bikers Get A Shave
Jackie Prepares The Body
Pokeys Blues
Jackie Hitches Outa Nowhere
Jackie Bin Baptized
Country Driving
The Devil's Playground
Into The Land Of Fire
Fires Of Hell
Pokey Remembers
Doc Satan
Nightmate Drive
The Getaway (Reprise)
1997 BLIND WINDOWS
Fever Dream
Un Chien Andalou
Masquerade
Blind Windows/Countervail
Blind Windows
Mooncurse
The Million Year Picnic
Lost Lenore
Islands
Til Death Do Us Part
Ylla
Blind Windows
The Chase
Marsden Versions
In '1997 he released Blind Windows, a loose collection of instrumental remixes of his earlier works. The CD got worldwide distribution, reaching No3 on the Canadian Indie Charts. He continued doing local projects while finding time to write for the next album. Nash the Slash's whole persona is an enigma, complete with wrap-around bandages to conceal his true identity. This CD is a compilation of his first two solo releases following his first departure from FM. The songs are entirely instrumental and entirely solo, and very hard to categorize. While it is electronic, it isn't "dance" or "ambient" or "new age," and yet all of those genres go into the mix. There is a small debt paid to Eno, but Nash creates his own unique, original sound. He is capable of writing beautiful and haunting melodies, as evidenced by such songs as "Un Chien Andalou" and the incredible "Masquerade." At the same time, he is able to create music from noise, terrifying the unsuspecting listener. All the music tends to lean towards darkness, but some songs are just downright creepy (let's not forget his second album, included in its entirety on this CD, was titled Dreams and Nightmares). "Blind Windows/Countervail," "Lost Lenore," and "'Til Death Do Us Part" are prime examples of the more unsettling side, and yet in their own way these songs are also quite beautiful. Fans will delight in being able to obtain his first two albums on CD, and music fans craving something different and original would enjoy this CD. As an added bonus, the EP Bedside Companion is included twice, once in its original form, and once in a slowed-down 33 version (the EP was recorded to be played at 45 rpm). Both versions are equally enjoyable. Highly recommended.
1999 THRASH
Something Weird On My TV
Tension
Theory Of The Black Hole
We Will Be The Leaders
End Of The Millenium
Thrash
Give Me The Creeps
Vincent's Crows
I'll Wait For You
Guns And Sandwiches
Underground
Shock Treatment
1999 Thrash was released in '99 and contained Slash's trademark penchant for the macabre set in an electronic atmosphere, including the title track, "Theory of The Black Hole," "End Of The Millenium," "Give Me The Creeps, and "Guns And Sandwiches." This CD features a new recording of "Vincent's Crows". And this CD does not disappoint; if anything, Nash has improved with age. Still essentially a solo artist, Nash collaborated with a couple of lyricists for this outing, and the result is brilliant. Nash continues to write his own unique brand of music, which is still difficult to categorize — rock, dance, ambient, and electronic all mixed together to form a new sound. The songs are full of classic Nash violin solos, and his voice has never sounded better. The music seems to be a bit harder, especially in the percussion sounds, and noisier than one is used to hearing from Nash. And how many artists can use the scream of a large cat (not identified, although it sounds like a panther) to effect in a rock song? But again it works. At the same time, Nash's gentler side is seen in the beautiful, sadly touching "I'll Wait for You." Fans of his music should not be disappointed with this outing, and although the music is somewhat eclectic, adventurous music fans will enjoy this CD. A brief warning: as with most of Nash's output, some of the music is unsettling and downright scary at points ("Theory of the Black Hole"); however, this does not detract from the brilliance of the work.
2001 NOSFERATU
Murnau's Vision
Nina and Jonathon
Renfield's Scheme
Don't Worry Nina
Foreboding Journey
Jonathon Awakes
The Land of Phantoms
You Are Late
Blood
Letter to Nina
What a Lovely Throat
Fear and Premonition
Sense of Menance
The Crypt
Dracula Packs
Rats
Venus Flytraps and Other Vampires
Nina Among the Dunes
Fatal Breath
Renfield's Master
Dracula Unpacks
Nosferatu
The Ship of Horrors
Drum Alarm
The Book of Vampires
Plague
Renfield's Revenge
Nina's Trance
Sacrificing Nina
The Morning Sun
In 2001 he returned to adding modern a modern touch to silent films, scoring a re-release of the first actual vampire movie 'Nosferatu'. .
2001 LOST IN SPACE
Black Noise
Phasors On Stun
One O' Clock Tomrrow
Baba O'Riley
The Only Way To Win
Friends & Neighbours
It's My Life
Why Don't You Take It
Starless
This same year an FM greatest hits package called Lost In Space – Obscurities And Oddities was released nicely summing up the group's three albums
2008 IN-A-GADDA-DA-NASH
Astronomy Domine 
21st Centry Schizoid Man 
Animal Magnetism 
The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald 
Baby O'Riley 
Follow the Leader 
In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida 
Constantinople 

In-A-Gadda-Da-Nash (2008) – CD
This CD from 2008 offers 45 minutes of deviant power rock music. Nash has dragged his gear out into the daylight and dipped way back into ancient history for a selection of classic tunes that he feels modern generations cannot live without. Nash plays electric violins, electric mandolins, synthesizers, drum machines, assorted noises, and vocals. Be forewarned: this album features cover tunes chosen from 1967 to 1981. Be further cautioned: these versions may cause severe psychological damage to listeners who are not prepared for wildly exciting deviations. Pink Floyd’s “Astronomy Domine.” epitomizes the psychedelic rock era, and Nash does the composition savage justice. Wailing strings establish searing riffs that skirt the interstellar realm, while spacey electronics perfectly capture a cosmic disposition. Haunting vocals resound from the other side of a dimensional barrier, communicating an obsession with mankind’s urge to explore the unknown.
King Crimson’s “21st Century Schizoid Man.” A prime example of Nash’s mandolin serving up blazing fury with emphatic puissance. Demonstrative vocals resound with an artificial edge. Edgy electronics and crisp e-perc establish an elevating instrumental passage.
Scorpions’ “Animal Magnetism.” Metallic beats and guttural chords provide a gritty foundation for vocals that wail from a submerged vantage.
Gordon Lightfoot’s “The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald.” Shrill mandolin punctuates a stately vocal presentation supported by folksy strumming. Electronics produce a threatening hurricane that the searing mandolin riffs strive to ward off.
The Who’s “Baba O’Riley.” Classic cyclic riffs are embellished with bass notes, as Nash’s rich vocals achieve a commanding presence. Mandolin and electronics handle the central melody with increasing intensity. Drifting violin slides into a frenzied delivery of enthusiasm.
Killing Joke’s “Follow the Leaders.” Husky riffs and pounding percussion generate a steadfast tension accompanied by hoarsely anthem vocals. Pulsing keyboards contribute a throbbing undercurrent. A crashing euphony is achieved.
Iron Butterfly’s “In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida.” Things switch to a dreamily psychedelic demeanor with this song, but the somnambulance is seasoned with an ominous darkness. Keyboard sweeps carry portentous weight. Growling mandolin rises amid the mix to produce a lavish intensity of fierce proportion. The signature drum solo is supported by eerie electronics which harbor a touch of hostility, eventually adopting a lilting stretch before the gripping finale.
The Residents’ “Constantinople.” Sparse structure marks this quirky tune with isolated riffs, strident rhythms, and vocals that evolve into a multitracked myriad of voices. Things escalate with shuddering electronics.
While retaining the period charm of these classic tunes, Nash infuses his own style on each piece, subjecting the melodies to delightfully foreboding airs

2009 LIVE IN LONDON 2008
Psychlone
Tension
Swing-Shift
Children of the Night
Something Weird on My TV
Normal
21st Century Schizoid Man
We Will Be The Leaders
Dead Man's Curve
Underground
Baba O'Riley
In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida
In 2009, the long awaited concert captured on tape happened, when he released the nearly hour-long Live In London, taped during his 2008 UK tour, featuring a number of his own compositions, as well as covers of "21st Century Schizoid Man," "Dead Man's Curve," "Baba O'Riley," and "In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida."
2011 THE RECKLESS USE OF ELECTRICITY
The Million-Year Picnic
Something Weird On My TV
The Hypnotist 
Swing Shift (Soixante-Neuf)
Fever Dream 
We Will Be The Leaders
Ylla 
Wolf 
Citizen 
Remember When 
In Search Of Prey 
Islands 
I'll Wait For You
Children Of The Night
Lost Lenore
Pretty Folkes 
Lake Ontario Suite (Pt.1)
Dance After Curfew
Reactor No.2
Metropolis 
Underground
Crab Waltz 
The Artoffact Records vinyl reissue CLICK HERE TO BUY
2016 Hammersmith Holocaust Black Vinyl.
A1 Wolf
A2 Smoke On The Water
B1 Children Of The Night
B2 Barbara O'Riley
B3 Danger Zone
Artoffact Records reissues Hammersmith Holocaust in an expanded gatefold sleeve, complete with a replica of the original insert, printed inside the fold. As a special bonus, Gary Numan, without whom the live show would not have happened, has written a wonderful piece for the liner notes, explaining why he invited Nash to be his support, as well as how influential Nash was over the years. 
The Artoffact Records vinyl reissue CLICK HERE TO BUY
2016 Hammersmith Holocaust Special Edition Square-Splatter Vinyl
A1 Wolf
A2 Smoke On The Water
B1 Children Of The Night
B2 Barbara O'Riley
B3 Danger Zone
Artoffact Records reissues Hammersmith Holocaust in an expanded gatefold sleeve, complete with a replica of the original insert, printed inside the fold. As a special bonus, Gary Numan, without whom the live show would not have happened, has written a wonderful piece for the liner notes, explaining why he invited Nash to be his support, as well as how influential Nash was over the years. 
The Artoffact Records vinyl reissue CLICK HERE TO BUY
2016 Children of the Night. CD Digipak
1 Wolf 
2 Dead Man's Curve 
3 Children Of The Night 
4 Deep Forest 
5 In A Glass Eye 
6 19th Nervous Breakdown 
7 Swing Shift (Soixante-Neuf) 
8 Metropolis 
9 Dopes On The Water 
10 Danger Zone
11 Wolf (Live)
12 Danger Zone (Live)
13 Reactor No. 2
14 Swing Shift (Original 45 RPM Version)
15 Swing Shift (Fleix Version)
16 Children of the Night (Live) 
The Artoffact Records CD reissue includes six bonus tracks. The audio and artwork have been restored to the highest possible quality, and the set comes with a spectacular booklet showcasing many unreleased photos of Nash backstage and on-stage. The CD comes in a beautiful 6-panel digipak
The Artoffact Records vinyl reissue CLICK HERE TO BUY
2016 Children of the Night. 2LP Black Vinyl.
A1 Wolf 
A2 Dead Man's Curve 
A3 Children Of The Night 
A4 Deep Forest 
A5 In A Glass Eye 
B1 19th Nervous Breakdown 
B2 Swing Shift (Soixante-Neuf) 
B3 Metropolis 
B4 Dopes On The Water 
B5 Danger Zone
C1 Wolf (Live)
C2 Danger Zone (Live)
C3 Reactor No. 2
D1 Swing Shift (Original 45 RPM Version)
D2 Swing Shift (Fleix Version)
D3 Children of the Night (Live) 
The Artoffact Records vinyl reissue comes in an expanded, double-LP gatefold and includes six bonus tracks. The audio and artwork have been restored to the highest possible quality, and the set comes with a spectacular vinyl-sized booklet showcasing many unreleased photos of Nash backstage and on-stage.
The Artoffact Records vinyl reissue CLICK HERE TO BUY
2016 Children of the Night. Special Edition Fog-Blue 2LP Vinyl. 
A1 Wolf 
A2 Dead Man's Curve 
A3 Children Of The Night 
A4 Deep Forest 
A5 In A Glass Eye 
B1 19th Nervous Breakdown 
B2 Swing Shift (Soixante-Neuf) 
B3 Metropolis 
B4 Dopes On The Water 
B5 Danger Zone
C1 Wolf (Live)
C2 Danger Zone (Live)
C3 Reactor No. 2
D1 Swing Shift (Original 45 RPM Version)
D2 Swing Shift (Fleix Version)
D3 Children of the Night (Live) 
The Artoffact Records vinyl reissue comes in an expanded, double-LP gatefold and includes six bonus tracks. The audio and artwork have been restored to the highest possible quality, and the set comes with a spectacular vinyl-sized booklet showcasing many unreleased photos of Nash backstage and on-stage.
The Artoffact Records vinyl reissue CLICK HERE TO BUY
2016 Bedside Companion Black Vinyl.
Side A: Bedside Companion
1. Fever Dream
2. Masquerade
3. Blind Windows
4. The Million-Year Picnic

Side B: The Marsden Versions
5. Fever Dream (Marsden)
6. Masquerade (Marsden)
7. Blind Windows (Marsden)
8. The Million-Year Picnic (Marsden) 
Nash the Slash's debut 12" came in the form of Bedside Companion, a four-track EP that Nash claimed was the first ever that could be played at two speeds (45 RPM and 33 1/3 RPM). Later, when the material was released on CD, both speeds were recorded to extend the EP to eight tracks. This eight track version never appeared on vinyl until now.
The Artoffact Records vinyl reissue CLICK HERE TO BUY
2016 Bedside Companion Special Edition Black/White Half-&-Half Vinyl.
Side A: Bedside Companion
1. Fever Dream
2. Masquerade
3. Blind Windows
4. The Million-Year Picnic

Side B: The Marsden Versions
5. Fever Dream (Marsden)
6. Masquerade (Marsden)
7. Blind Windows (Marsden)
8. The Million-Year Picnic (Marsden) 
Nash the Slash's debut 12" came in the form of Bedside Companion, a four-track EP that Nash claimed was the first ever that could be played at two speeds (45 RPM and 33 1/3 RPM). Later, when the material was released on CD, both speeds were recorded to extend the EP to eight tracks. This eight track version never appeared on vinyl until now.
The Artoffact Records vinyl reissue CLICK HERE TO BUY
2016 Dreams And Nightmares. Black Vinyl.
Left Side
A1 Islands
A2 Ylla
A3 The Chase
A4 Un Chien Andalou

Right Side
B1 Blind Windows / Countervail
B2 Moon Curse
B3 Lost Lenore
B4 'Til Death Do Us Part 
Shortly after releasing Dreams and Nightmares, Nash would meet and inspire Gary Numan, play on Numan's DANCE album, and support Numan in the UK in 1980 and 81.

The Artoffact Records vinyl reissue is remastered and comes in a gorgeous gatefold sleeve. The tracks on the vinyl are the same versions as originally released in 1979 (subsequent Dreams and Nightmares reissues had different lengths). 
The Artoffact Records vinyl reissue CLICK HERE TO BUY
2016 Dreams And Nightmares. Special Edition Black-Inside-White Vinyl.
Left Side
A1 Islands
A2 Ylla
A3 The Chase
A4 Un Chien Andalou

Right Side
B1 Blind Windows / Countervail
B2 Moon Curse
B3 Lost Lenore
B4 'Til Death Do Us Part 
Shortly after releasing Dreams and Nightmares, Nash would meet and inspire Gary Numan, play on Numan's DANCE album, and support Numan in the UK in 1980 and 81.

The Artoffact Records vinyl reissue is remastered and comes in a gorgeous gatefold sleeve. The tracks on the vinyl are the same versions as originally released in 1979 (subsequent Dreams and Nightmares reissues had different lengths). 
The Artoffact Records vinyl reissue CLICK HERE TO BUY
2016 Dreams And Nightmares including Bedside Companion. 2CD Digipak.
CD1: Dreams and Nightmares
1 Islands
2 Ylla
3 The Chase
4 Un Chien Andalou
5 Blind Windows / Countervail
6 Moon Curse
7 Lost Lenore
8 'Til Death Do Us Part

CD2: Bedside Companion
1. Fever Dream
2. Masquerade
3. Blind Windows
4. The Million-Year Picnic
The Marsden Versions
5. Fever Dream (Marsden)
6. Masquerade (Marsden)
7. Blind Windows (Marsden)
8. The Million-Year Picnic (Marsden) 
The Artoffact Records 2CD reissue is remastered and comes in a beautiful DVD-sized tall digipak with booklet. The first CD includes all the tracks as originally appeared on the 1979 vinyl. The second CD is Bedside Companion, an EP that Nash released in 1978, while claiming that it was the first EP ever that could be played at two speeds (45 and 33 1/3). On this CD, both speeds are included so that the EP is expanded to eight tracks.
The Artoffact Records vinyl reissue CLICK HERE TO BUY
Reissue Super-Collector Pack. All CDs & All the Vinyl.
This collector's pack allows you to buy copies of every Nash the Slash reissue, including all possible colours of the vinyl. The special edition vinyl AND black vinyl are included, and you will receive a sleeve for each (i.e. two sleeves per release, two complete releases). CD reissues are also included. You will receive the following releases:

Dreams and Nightmares incl. Bedside Companion - 2CD
Dreams and Nightmares - Black Vinyl
Dreams and Nightmares - Special Edition Vinyl
ABedside Companion - Black Vinyl
Bedside Companion - Special Edition Vinyl
Children of the Night - Special Edition 2LP Vinyl
Children of the Night - Black 2LP Vinyl
Children of the Night - CD
Hammersmith Holocaust - Special Edition Vinyl
Hammersmith Holocaust - Black Vinyl
The Artoffact Records vinyl reissue CLICK HERE TO BUY
Reissue Collector Pack. All CDs & Special Edition Vinyl.
This collector's pack allows you to buy copies of every Nash the Slash reissue in one copy. The special edition vinyl is included. Black vinyl is NOT included. CD reissues are also included. You will receive the following releases:

Dreams and Nightmares incl. Bedside Companion - 2CD
Dreams and Nightmares - Special Edition Vinyl
Bedside Companion - Special Edition Vinyl
Children of the Night - Special Edition 2LP Vinyl
Children of the Night - CD
Hammersmith Holocaust - Special Edition Vinyl
The Artoffact Records vinyl reissue CLICK HERE TO BUY

NASH THE SLASH QUESTIONS & ANSWERS

Questions / Answers

Questions: What is your musical background and at what age did you learn to play the violin and mandolin ?.

Nash the Slash: Trained on classical violin age 8 to 18. Self-taught on mandolin age 16 (same tuning as violin)

Questions: Where/when did you first perform as a rock band/artist ?

Nash the Slash: 1975 The Roxy Theatre performing live to the silent film "Un Chien Andalou"

Questions: What was the first commercially available material featuring yourself (either solo or as part of a group).

Nash the Slash: FM's first LP "Black Noise" came out in 1978 at the same time I released my first EP "Bedside Companion"

Questions: What bands/artists influenced you as a teenager ?

Nash the Slash: My teen years were in the Sixties so there was very little electronic music, but the groups I enjoyed were The Who,The Kinks, Cream, Hendrix, Soft Machine. The real influences came in the Seventies; Kraut Rock, Hawkwind, The Silver Apples, Moondog, Syrinx, Roxy Music, Eno, Fripp, etc.

Questions: What bands did you work with before FM (as Nash The Slash) ?

Nash the Slash: None.

Questions: Most fans know that 'Nash' was a character in a 1920's Laurel and Hardy film, but why did you decide to create 'Nash the Slash' the recording artist and musician ?

Nash the Slash: It was a great stage name and I already was a musician.

Questions: What was the reaction of your friends at the time, when you decided to perform as 'Nash the Slash' ?

Nash the Slash: "Nash The Slash" performed live without bandages for the first 4 years. My friends just thought it was a cool stage name.

Questions: How do you manage to keep cool on stage when dressed as Nash ?, and have you ever collapsed with heat exhaustion due to the bandages ?

Nash the Slash: The bandages are not a mask. They are wrapped on every night and discarded. I spend about $600 a year on bandages. They are wrapped on in a special way. They are soaked in cold water to better layer them as well as keep me cool for the first 20 minutes. They are removed between sets. The hottest gig I have ever done was at a pavillion in the summer of 1983. The building had no air-conditioning, and by showtime there were 500 people in a room that was estimated at the time to be over 35 C.I drank two gallons of water and lost 4 pounds during the performance.

Questions: When FM started to take off, what was the reaction of the fans to Nash ?

Nash the Slash: I had already left the group when FM began to "take off". In the early days with FM, I never wore the bandages.

Questions: Is it common knowledge in music circles in Canada/Toronto as to your real indentity ?

Nash the Slash: It is a well-kept secret.

Questions: Do you know in which european country 'Children' sold the most copies ?

Nash the Slash: The UK for sure.(ps..Are you guys Europeans yet? :)

Questions: In 1981 you appear on Gary Numans album 'Dance', do you appear on any other artists/bands records,

Nash the Slash: Some I don't remember the titles. I played on a Ken Lockie single. I recorded in Canada with "Drastic Measures" 1979 and The Spiney Anteaters 1998

Questions: What instrument do you tend to compose with the most and why?

Nash the Slash: I always start with a simple drum machine pattern and then jam on mandolin or keyboards. It's the fastest way to get creative. I don't record with a computer. It's too slow to get things up and running. The computer is only good for editing later.

Questions: Let me get your thoughts on a few tracks - just whatever pops into your head. Let's start with Vincent's Crows.

Nash the Slash: Vincent's Crows is one of my favorite tracks. The lyrics by Toby Dammit are brilliant and lend themselves perfectly to the drama of the music.

Questions: Theory Of The Black Hole.

Nash the Slash: A very strange piece. Words by Dr. K. Syinide. It wasn't very long so I decided to repeat the whole thing backwards.

Questions: Friends And Neighbours.

Nash the Slash: The best version of this song is the original demo I released on the CD, Lost in Space. This CD is a collection of FM demos and live recordings from 1978 to 1985. F&N has a completely different melody and has way more balls to it. I really liked the original and hated the LP version. The producer had too much influence on Cameron.

Questions: As an independent artist, how much of an impact has the internet had on sales, in either a positive or negative sense?

Nash the Slash: The Internet is a great place for promotion, but lousy for sales. As an independent, I have no way of challenging bootleggers. I say to my fans, 'I won't sell out, don't you sell out. Keep it honest.' I can't ask for more than that.

Questions: Were you 'pushed into a corner' to record/release 'Novel Romance' ?,or were you happy with it ?

Nash the Slash:I was pushed. How can you tell?!!? - Virgin wanted another song that wasn't on the LP "children" and I had nothing prepared. I don't write quickly or without intent but it was great fun working with Bill Nelson.

Questions: American Bandages is certainly one of my favourite LP's of all time - are you happy with it and how was it received in the US and Canada ?

Nash the Slash: American Bandages was a fun project. I had the idea to do an 'American Cover LP' for many years. It was the producer's idea to involve Cam and Martin from FM. Ironically, due to bad management and a worse record deal, the LP was never released in the USA. Go figure. It is to this day a cult album in America.

Questions: You have worked with FM on and off many times over the years - is there a story to tell here ?

Nash the Slash: After we collaborated on American Bandages, it was an agent's idea that we should re-group. The agent said he could make us a lot of money. We did, but I spent 4 more years NOT DOING Nash the Slash. Bad artistic decision.

Questions:FM's music and the music of Nash the Slash is very different, were there many disagreements between you and Cameron Hawkins over the years regading the music style and content ?

Nash the Slash: Cam and I rarely agreed on musical direction. The strongest influences on FM music came from my exposure to European electronic music. Cam was into The Beach Boys.

Questions: Now a difficult one - which album or individual track ranks as your personal favourite and why ?

Nash the Slash:Right now I am re-mastering 'Decomposing' and 'Normal'. I am amazed that I wrote this stuff over 15 years ago. Every time an artist revisits their recorded past, there can be embarrasments and new discoveries. I can only express satisfaction with my whole recorded output.

Questions: Why did you leave it until 1999 to return with a new solo album ?

Nash the Slash: 1983- American Bandages, 1984-1989 - FM, 1990-1997 - film scores. All these years I was compiling material. Some tracks on 'Thrash' are over 10 years  old.

Questions: You mention elsewhere that you do not use sequencers,samplers and PC's for music composition - have you tried out the technology (i.e Cubase, Acid, Rebirth etc) ?

Nash the Slash: I haven't got time to learn a whole new approach to composing. I get by with very simple tools. When I say I don't use sequencers, I really mean I don't own a dedicated sequencer. However, sequence-like riffs can be created by feeding a midi signal from the Alesis drum machine to a Roland D50 kbd. A sequencer was used on such tunes as 'Born to be Wild'. On 'Children', I had a Crumar Multiman that was aset of bass pedals with a built-in drum machine and bass sequences plus chords, either in rhythm mode or drone. This crazy machine was made in Italy for your typical mom and pop wedding duo. I called it my 'Poppa-chichi' machine from the sound of the drum machine. By the time I got through adding echo,fuzz and octavider (yes,sub-octave effects on bass pedals!) I could create entire live pieces with this device. 'Wolf' is a totally live example of the Crumar. So is 'In A Glass Eye' and 'Danger Zone'. There are others on the LP 'Normal'.

Questions: Will you be embracing any new technology in the near future as far as your music is concerned ?

Nash the Slash: There are many tricks I used with my tape recorders. One example is the drum sound on 'Swing-shift'. It is an Roland rhythm 55 drum machine. It was played at double the intended tempo and recorded onto the reel-to-reel at 15ips. When played back at 71/2 ips, the drums were now at the right tempo but VERY HEAVY!!! This trick Iused with other drum machines (Womble). I am the proud owner of the first drum machine Roland ever made. I bought my Rhythm 55 in 1976 and I still use it to this day. It is the drum sound in Dead Man's Curve and Dopes on the Water. I could write a book on early drum machines. When you are very familiar with the tools at hand, you can do anything. The modern computer hardware involves a steep learning curve for me, and I think I get interesting results by being creative in other ways. I can see myself using hardisk storage. DAT tapes and machines are not very reliable. Today, we need more back-ups to avoid loss or damage. I never had these problems with analog tapes or machines.

Questions: Who is 'Nash The Slash' - how would you describe the man behind the music ?  

Nash the Slash: Tall and thin. Long fingernails with pointy ears and teeth. My autobiography is called 'Whatever Happened to Max Schreck?'

Questions: Is there anything you would still like to achieve in the music world ?

Nash the Slash: I would like to perform my music with a very large string orchestra (40 players) and hand out fuzz boxes to just the cello section!

Questions: Which would you rather have, a platinum selling album or a commission to score a major Hollywood movie ?

Nash the Slash: I would like to score a really twisted underground movie that becomes a cult classic and be paid one million pieces of 3000 mm diameter plates of pure platinum, 50 mm thick.

Questions: Which gives you the most pleasure - writing/composing or performing ?  

Nash the Slash: None of the above. The greatest pleasure I get is writing books like 'Frog Jumping For Dummies'. And why ? Got a frog?  

Questions: Who is the best musician you have ever worked with ?

Nash the Slash: That's a hard question. Who have I actually played with that I thought was a really great musician ? or anyone I may have worked with ( producers don't necessarily play on the sessions) My favourite musician to work with and me being a BIG FAN was definitely Bill Nelson, but Bill and I never actually played a note together. I have worked with some of the best session players in Canada ( soundtrack to the Bruce McDonald film Highway 61)  

Questions: What were your thoughts and feelings towards the UK music scene in 1980/81, and why did you return to Canada when your career appeared to be going so well in the UK ?  

Nash the Slash:The UK music scene was beginning to implode on itself. The punks were fading out or literally dying off (Malcolm Owens, singer for The Ruts, was the greatest loss I can think of) and the experimental bands like Ultravox were going through serious changes. Their singer John Foxx ,went solo and sounded like the Emperor with no clothes, while Ultravox found Midge Ure for their new voice and started a whole new career. The Stranglers survived as did Siouxie as well as The Cure but many exciting bands I heard while I was living in England exploded on impact!. Such is the volatile nature of the British music scene. One joke amongst local musicians was the over -the- top support an artist would get from the New Music Express or NME. One month a rave review, the next month a scathing put-down as if the performer was the reviewers' personal whipping boy. The NME was well named. To many musicians they were known and pronounced by their intials - The En,Emy! Back in Canada I had a touring schedule to get back to. The gig scene in the UK was very limited. You went out and played the rooms once around the country only when the industry says it's your turn to do so. There were too many groups for any individual artist to be blazing their own trail. In Canada, I was the Prodigal Son Returns and I could make the most of it.

Questions: What does the short term future hold for you ?

Nash the Slash: Promoting the live performances of the silent film 'NOSFERATU'

Questions: Are you working on any new material intended for commercial release ?

Nash the Slash: I have 3 back-catalog CD's ready plus a CD of all-new instrumentals. I would also like to release the 3 silent film scores I've done. At the present time I have over 6 hours of live music for immediate performance.

Questions: Are you happy with the way things are going for you at present ?

Nash the Slash:  Today was kinda shitty. I sprained my right index finger while doing some gardening. Lucky it wasn't my left hand (fingering you know)

Questions: After over 3 decades of performing live, what still excites you most about stepping onto that stage?

Nash the Slash: Have you ever heard the roar of an Indie race-car or the sound of a jet fighter taking off? It's the volume that gets your heart pounding. Have you ever heard anyone else play the violin at 120 decibels? It still turns my crank.

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